A further example of plagiarism in Labour's Future of Work discussion paper

UPDATE: Labour has now added citations as footnotes which is inadequate since they continue to use material lifted directly from elsewhere without appropriate attribution and no quotation marks.  Please note, however, the addition of footnotes occurred only after the plagiarism was revealed on this blog and elsewhere in the media. 

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 While I have yet to apply a fine-tooth comb to the document, a further example of outright plagiarism has come to light:

In the SECOND SENTENCE of the Introduction, Labour writes:

Work done in entirely new technology businesses, the huge range of knowledge and media endeavours, the factory floor, and even family businesses have been reshaped by new pathways to information and new ways of selling goods and services. For most office workers now, life on the job means life online.

On December 30, 2014, Kirsten Purcell and Lee Rainie at the Pew Research Center released a paper entitled "Technology's Impact on Workers" in which they wrote:

Work done in the most sophisticated scientific enterprises, entirely new technology businesses, the extensive array of knowledge and media endeavors, the places where crops are grown, the factory floor, and even mom-and-pop stores has been reshaped by new pathways to information and new avenues of selling goods and services. For most office workers now, life on the job means life online.

Plagiarism is never acceptable...but really?  You're going to copy and paste someone else's work without attribution in the second sentence of the Introduction?