US Campaign Update, 12/01/16: Top 10 Stories

1. In USA Today, David Jackson reports about the recent New Hampshire poll with Trump having a big lead.

The latest Monmouth University Poll gives Trump 32% in New Hampshire, with a tight battle for second among TedCruz (14%), John Kasich (14%), and Marco Rubio (12%). Further behind are Chris Christie (8%), Carly Fiorina (5%), Jeb Bush (4%), Rand Paul (4%), and Ben Carson (3%).
The poll noted that only one in three voters "have completely locked in their vote choice," while one in four "arestill very much up for grabs." The Feb. 9 New Hampshire primary comes eight days after the Iowa caucuses start off the nomination process.
 

2. In the Des Moines Register, Tony Leys talks about Hillary Clinton's immigration policies.

“I cannot sit here and tell you I have a blanket rule about who will or who won’t be let into the country to stay, because it has to be done individual by individual,” she said. “What I don’t like are the mass roundups and the raids ... That should end.”
 She stressed that to ease immigration pressure, the United States should help improve conditions in Central American countries. She noted relatively few Mexicans are now crossing into the United States, because problems in their country have eased. That should be the goal for Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, which are now major sources of desperate immigrants.

 

3. In Reuters, Andy Sullivan and Grant Smith talk about about why a white supremacist group backs Trump’s presidential candidacy.

A white supremacist group said it has placed thousands of automated phone calls in Iowa urging voters to back billionaire Donald Trump's bid for the Republican presidential nomination because "we don't need Muslims."
The telephone campaign is led by the American Freedom Party, which on its website says it "shares the customs and heritage of the European American people."  The calls featured the spokesman of a white supremacist group that Dylann Roof, who is accused of gunning down nine people at a black church in South Carolina in June, had reportedly cited as inspiration.

 

4. In Huffington Post, Marina Fang discusses Sanders controversial gun vote.

 Pressed on the issue at a Democratic candidates forum on Monday, Sanders said that he does not think his vote was a mistake, but would consider revising the law to prosecute large gun manufacturers who may know that their guns "are being distributed to criminal elements."
 
"If you are a gun manufacturer who is selling guns into an area and you’re selling a whole lot of guns, and you have reason to believe that a lot of those guns are not meant for people in that area, but are being distributed to criminal elements, should you be prosecuted? Damn right," he told Fusion's Jorge Ramos.

 

5. In CNN,  Eric Bradner talks about Rubio’s statement about the Philadelphia mayor.

"The mayor of Philadelphia -- who I know nothing about other than the fact that he's delusional -- said this has nothing to do with ISIS or Islam; this is because there are too many guns in the street."
Rubio continued, saying that the shooting happened "because there are too many terrorists in the streets." He condemned Democrats for avoiding the phrase "radical Islamic terrorist."

 

6. In CNN, Dan Merica writes about Clinton’s plan to hike tax by 4% on top earners.

Clinton's plan -- what she is calling the "fair share surcharge" -- would raise taxes on .02% of taxpayers, Clinton's campaign said Monday, leaving 99.98% all taxpayers unaffected. The proposal would also pair with the "Buffett Rule," a tax proposal pushed by the Obama administration that would require a 30% rate in federal taxes on anyone making more than $1 million dollars a year after charitable donations.
"It's outrageous that multi-millionaires and billionaires are allowed to play by a different set of rules than hard-working families, especially when it comes to paying their fair share of taxes," Clinton said in a statement.

 

7. In CNN, Eric Bradner in the CNN writes about Rubio’s statement about the Philadelphia mayor.

"The mayor of Philadelphia -- who I know nothing about other than the fact that he's delusional -- said this has nothing to do with ISIS or Islam; this is because there are too many guns in the street."
Rubio continued, saying that the shooting happened "because there are too many terrorists in the streets." He condemned Democrats for avoiding the phrase "radical Islamic terrorist."

 

8.  In CNN, Ted Barrett discusses about Mitch McConnell mission in the Senate.

A constant and challenging task in the months ahead for McConnell will be to protect incumbent senators like Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, Mark Kirk of Illinois, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Rob Portman of Ohio, and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin from politically difficult votes on free trade, guns, abortion, and other sensitive social issues that could cause them trouble back home.
McConnell, who is firmly rooted in the establishment wing of the GOP, spent his first year running the chamber with a strategic eye toward the 2016 Senate elections. He believes he made an important down payment to voters by proving Republicans can govern more effectively and successfully than Democrats.

 

9.  In the Huffington Post, Mollie Reilly writes about Clinton’s calls on Obama to end deportation raids.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton called for an end to the Obama administration's deportation raids targeting mothers and children fleeing violence in Central America, arguing the policy creates "unnecessary fear and disruption."
"Our immigration enforcement efforts should be humane and conducted in accordance with due process, and that is why I believe we must stop the raids happening in immigrant communities," Clinton said in a statement. "We have laws and we must be guided by those laws, but we shouldn’t have armed federal officers showing up at peoples’ homes, taking women and children out of their beds in the middle of the night. The raids have sown fear and division in immigrant communities across the country."

10.  In the NBC News, Adam Howard reports about Trump’s thoughts on Clinton.

"I think she'll win [the Democratic nomination], I guess, but she's got the email problem, she got a big problem with emails and we'll see what happens," Trump said. "She certainly has a race that's a lot different than people thought."
 
"She came out with a little bit of statement about me, and then I came out with a very big statement about her and Bill, and she's not talking about me all of a sudden," Trump said to laughs from the audience.